History of our work

 

For more than two decades, Somalia has been stricken by conflict and drought, chronic food insecurity and displacement. Civil war and anarchy have reduced the major cities to ruins and destroyed just about all public institutions. The resulting chaos and lack of a functional government meant the challenges the organization needed to face are complex and multiple.  

Therefore for the UN, how to process to deliver humanitarian assistance and implement recovery and development programmes has imposed itself as a challenging question. How to make sure that the aid coming to Somalia is used effectively and for the priorities of its people? What is the path from a failed state to a stable and prosperous one?

The “New Deal”, our previous framework adressed exactly these issues, as a new approach to support fragile states that are trying to recover from conflict and rebuild their societies, their institutions, and their government.

 

The New Deal for Somalia

The New Deal for Somalia was endorsed at the Brussels Conference on 16 September 2013. The New Deal movement goes back to an initiative taken at the fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness held in November 2011 in Busan, Korea, where the g7+3 group of 19 fragile and conflict-affected countries, development partners, and international organizations came up with a concept tailored to build peaceful states and societies out of the challenging situation in fragile contexts.

Recognizing the need for a shift in how international assistance is managed, the Somali Federal Government, together with its international partners, decided to adopt the New Deal in order to improve its ability to govern and make development more responsive to the needs and concerns of its citizens. This approach emphasized strengthening national capacities, ensuring the transition is Somali-owned and Somali-led to the greatest extent possible, improving transparency and accountability and building mutual trust among partners.

At the heart of Somalia’s New Deal was the Compact, which as an action plan articulated the country’s priorities for 2014–2016 – on which all actors involved, including the United Nations, should focus.

 

The New Deal Compact

The Somali Compact, signed on 16 September 2013 at the New Deal Conference in Brussels, was seen as a roadmap for promoting statebuilding and peacebuilding over the 2014-2016 period. This framework provided a strategic plan towards stability and peace across Somalia. To this end, the New Deal laid out five Peacebuilding and State-Building Goals (PSGs) which focus on inclusive politics, security, justice, economic foundations and revenue and services.